GKN Aerospace receives order for RM12 engine upgrade for the JAS 39 Gripen

Gripen takeoff
Gripen takeoff
  • Contract covers engine software upgrade, in order to improve engine performance and lower lifecycle costs.
  • Project will be delivered in partnership with FMV, Saab and with support from GE Aerospace.
  • Project enhances Sweden’s world-leading engine capability and ecosystem, ahead of ongoing product support for RM16 engine.

The Swedish Defence Materiel Administration (FMV) has awarded GKN Aerospace a contract to develop and improve the RM12 engine, which powers the Swedish fighter aircraft JAS 39 Gripen C/D. The engine upgrade will be implemented in co-operation with FMV and SAAB.

GKN Aerospace has built a 90-year strategic relationship with the Swedish Air Force and holds OEM-level scope of responsibility for the RM12 engine. The £2 million (SEK 23.6 million) contract is the last part of a development project that GKN Aerospace has been conducting since 2019.

In addition to enhancing key components within the engine, the development work also involves updating the engine software in the aircraft system. This will be delivered in partnership with SAAB and with GE Aerospace who is also supporting the development work. Upgraded RM12 engine testing will take place at GKN Aerospace’s facility in Trollhättan, Sweden, with flight testing undertaken by SAAB and FMV.

In addition to improved engine performance, the upgrade will also contribute to lower lifecycle costs for the users of the aircraft. The project will also strengthen the already world-leading engine capability within Sweden, ahead of the ongoing establishment of product support for RM16, the engine for the JAS 39 Gripen E/F.

Stefan Oscarsson, Vice President of Government & Space for GKN Aerospace Engine’s business, said: “We are extremely proud to contribute to strengthening Swedish defense capabilities. The order means that we at GKN Aerospace continue to strengthen our competence and ability to handle complex, full-engine systems for fighter aircraft for the future.”